Open Meeting – Making Space for Cycling (UK)

Our next open meeting will take place at 7pm on Thursday 17th November.  The venue will once again be LT2 in Richmond Building at the University of Portsmouth. We’ll be joined by Roger Geffen MBE, Policy Director of Cycling UK. Many of you may remember Roger, who last joined us in January 2014 to talk to us about CTC’s national campaigns. CTC has since transformed the more campaign focussed Cycling UK.

Cycling UK is preparing for a second phase of its national Space for Cycling campaign, in partnership with local campaign groups.  It aims to create better places for everyone, by enabling people of all ages and abilities to cycle for any local journey.  As well as enabling members of the public to call on councils to commit to planning high-quality cycle networks – and to finding the funding these will require – we are also creating a Space for Cycling toolkit.  This will support local campaign groups and councils to work constructively together on planning local cycle networks and prioritising schemes, using a suite of IT tools and crowd-sourced data. This will strengthen the hand of local campaigners – as local authorities seek their support for their funding proposals – while boosting their credibility, their visibility in the local media, and their supporter base.

This should be a really interesting meeting and a great chance for us to engage with Cycling UK’s national campaigns and to use them locally to help us make cycling work for Portsmouth. Put the date in your diaries.

October 2016 – what a month!

Our interim Chair, Ian Saunders writes: as October comes to a close, it’s been quite a month for the cyclist in Portsmouth.

On the positive side of the equation we had a successful Pedal Portsmouth Glow ride last weekend on the closed roads along the seafront while the Great South Run was using the space. The Petersfield to Queen Elizabeth Country Park cycle track has finally been completed, and Ned Boulting’s one man show ‘Bikeology’ came to the New Theatre Royal to discover his thoughts on cycling culture and cyclists and experiences of the Tour De France over the last 15 years he has worked on it.

There has also been some new infrastructure ‘installed’ along the east bound Havant Road, although depending on who you speak to and their previous experiences, the addition of paint is either a positive or a negative in terms of giving space and creating awareness of cycling. And that’s just the cyclists!

However it is all overshadowed by the release of the cycling casualty figures for the UK, and Portsmouth’s place at the top of table of the worst cities to for cycle safety. Jon Spencer has outlined the salient points on our website here and although the figure of 888 per million of population is down from 2014, it is not coming down fast enough. Therefore we are now writing all PCC councilors and the city’s MPs to get them to commit to halving the accident rate by 2020 as was outlined in our City to Share strategy presented to them two years ago.

Amongst the recent news stories about cycle casualties, traffic congestion, and new infrastructure being planned and installed, we’ve seen comments from the Council Leader and her head of Traffic and transport, but not the cabinet post holder for the department. Six months into his tenure, we are yet to hear publically of Councillor Fleming’s plans on how to combat congestion and pollution in the city, other than increasing the fees for the third parking permit at an address.

A good place to start might be our next Open Meeting on Thursday 17th November, and he would also be able to hear Cycling UK’s Campaigns and Policy Director Roger Geffen MBE talk about the second phase of their national Space for Cycling Campaign which will call on councils to commit to planning high-quality cycle networks, and to finding the funding these will require. Perhaps then we can start to reduce the unnecessary accidents on our roads.

And related to that final point, the clocks go back this weekend (October 29th), so the mornings and evenings will be darker and he days will (probably) be duller and greyer as we arrive in winter. Please ensure that you use your lights while cycling and ensure you are seen.

Ride Round Gosport

Only minutes away on the ferry, but you can find some lovely quiet lanes and great views across the harbour.  Flat, mostly quiet roads and cycle tracks.  Meet 10am at Gosport ferry, The Hard.  Ferry with bike £4.60 return.  We will have a couple of stops – including a cafe stop – bring snacks and drinks to keep you going!
Gosport ferry 2

Cycle Casualties 2015

The Department for Transport has recently released road safety statistics for 2015 and once again Portsmouth is shamed by the rate at which cyclists are hurt on our roads. We have the worst rate of cycle casualties of any city in England. A few London boroughs do have a worse casualty rate but taken as a whole London is safer than Portsmouth. Portsmouth also topped this unenviable league in 2014, 2012 and 2011.

Portsmouth’s cycle casualty rate for 2015 was 888 per million of population. This is very slightly better that the 2014 figure, but this is likely to be no more than a statistical blip. The city’s leaders have taken no concerted action to address road safety, despite our exhortations, preferring to wring their hands and claim there is little they can do because Portsmouth is such a crowded city.

This excuse does not stand up to close examination. England’s most densely populated area, Islington, is nearly three times as crowded as Portsmouth. Islington has a population density of 14,517 people per square kilometre compared to 5,141 in Portsmouth and yet the cyclist casualty rate is slightly lower in Islington with a rate of 882 compared to 888 in Portsmouth.

Waltham Forest, which has recently implemented a ‘mini-Holland’ scheme of cycle infrastructure improvements has a population density of 6,849 people per square kilometre. This is a third more than Portsmouth and yet the cyclist casualty rate is only 409, less than half the rate in Portsmouth. This goes to show what can be achieved with good infrastructure, even in densely populated areas.

It’s time our leaders recognised that this is happening on their watch and it is their problem to solve. It is not a dry statistic to be regretted and ignored, these are the residents of our city being hurt (or worse). Each of these casualties represents a day, week, month or even lifetime ruined or lost. Even minor accidents can have a huge effect on the victims, as the case studies at the end of this piece show.

It is past time to start taking cycle safety seriously. The city is gridlocked and desperately needs people to get out of their cars, but people are understandably put off by the danger on our streets.

For too long Portsmouth City Council has been putting in a token effort at cycle safety. That has to change. We are calling on councillors to commit to halving the cycle casualty rate by 2020. Their first step has to be proper funding for road safety and to recruit a world-class traffic engineer with expertise in cycling infrastructure to lead on it.

It is the first responsibility of government in a democratic society to protect and safeguard the lives of its citizens. Cyclists are citizens and the government of our city is currently failing us. Now is the time to act. It’s time to lift the city from it’s humiliating position as the most dangerous city for cyclists in the UK.

Read Simon’s story
Read John’s story

Sources

ONS Population Density Map
DfT Accident Statistics for 2015 (Table RAS 30045)

Gridlocked Again

Just over two years, in response to the city being plunged into gridlock by a lorry fire, we wrote an open letter to all councillors asking them to take action to prevent this from happening again. This is the event that triggered the leader of PCC, Cllr Donna Jones, to challenge us to come up with an alternative transport plan for the city. Our response was A City to Share, a strategy prioritising Active Travel to reduce the level of traffic on our roads.

This weekend, with the partial closure of the Eastern Rd bridge for maintenance, we were gridlocked once again and more of the same is scheduled for next weekend. Portsmouth’s road system operates at the limit of its capacity. It only takes a small event to tip the system into gridlock – that is what happened two years ago, that’s what happened this weekend and that is what is likely to happen next weekend.

So what has been done in those two years, and why are we still facing this same problem? We’ve certainly had no shortage of words of support – politicians of all hues put their names behind A City to Share when it came out. But what action have we had? Well there have been some positive changes, but too few to make a significant difference so far, and we’ve had some backward steps too.

On the plus side parking is being removed from Goldsmith Avenue and a new cycle lane added on the north side. This is an important step – using busy routes like goldsmith avenue for the storage of stationary vehicles narrows the road and causes conflict. This makes a dangerous and intimidating environment for cyclists. It would be great to see similar changes on other narrow A and B roads in the city, it would enable the creation of safe, direct and attractive cycle lanes that could really tempt people out of their cars.

We’ve also had a series of Sky Rides as well as some major cycle events. Great as these events are, though, they are unlikely to get more people to choose cycling as a way of getting around until we make the streets more pleasant to cycle on.

However, we’ve also had some backward steps, like the removal of the Mile End Rd bus lane and Portsmouth is still congested. Portsmouth still has an obesity problem. Portsmouth still has dangerously polluted air. The way to tackle all these issues is to reduce people’s dependence on private cars yet our politicians are still doing too little to achieve this.

We can only repeat our plea of 2014: “We are calling on you to act now. Plans need to be made now to fix our transport system. Portsmouth needs a plan to put sustainable transport at the heart of these plans and to come up with a joined-up strategy for sustainable transport. Portsmouth Cycle Forum is eager to work with councillors to improve travel in Portsmouth and support sustainable growth.”

We came good on our promise to work hard, delivering a sustainable transport strategy for free. Now it’s time for our politicians to really start delivering on their side of the deal.

Open Meeting – Thursday 22nd September

We have an open meeting on Thursday. We’ll be discussing the new Solent Deal to devolve transport and other powers from central government to a new Solent Authority. It’ll have money to spend and we want to make sure some it goes into cycling! We’ll also be talking about our Pompey Pothole project to record poor roads and updating you on what has happens since our last meeting. The meeting is at the university Richmond building off Queen St, starting 7pm.

Solent Deal – an environmentalist’s perspective

At the invitation of Clare Seek (Portsmouth Green Drinks coordinator), John Holland attended a meeting organised by environmental campaigners in Southampton with the purpose of getting more info on the Solent Deal and to discuss the implications for this on the environment, and talk about how they might like to respond to the consultation from that perspective.

Simon Letts (leader of Southampton City Council) gave a the history on devolution of power in the UK, and then some background into how we have arrived with current proposals to devolve certain powers from central Government to the combined authority encompassing Portsmouth, Southampton and the Isle of Wight.

It would seem that, despite the mask of negotiation and public consultation, the Solent authorities will be offered an “off the peg” deal – much the same as is being offered to other applicants.
Hampshire County Council is not a partner to the deal; instead they are promoting an alternative structure. The non-unitary authorities (Havant, Fareham, Eastleigh, East Hants) are not partners either at this time since they are not eligible to join (yet).

On transport there is enthusiasm to introduce London-style bus franchising to reintroduce some kind of coordination between the bus operators plus the building of a Light Rapid Transit network linking the key centres. Cycling, walking and cycling, alas, receive very little (if any) focus.

The authorities have a very strong focus on economic growth and we feel this sells our region short. For example there is no mention of having a happy healthy people, along with clean soil, water and air. The Local Enterprise Partnership has a seat at the decision table, and that is a pretty undemocratic body. And a small point is that the document doesn’t allow for anyway in which the mayor can be removed during their 4 year term, which seems to be a strange omission.

Seafront Cycleway Survey

 

A message from one of our members:

I am an MSc student at the University of Portsmouth.  I would be grateful if you could take the time to complete this survey which is part of my dissertation.  The aim is to find out how effective the seafront cycleway east of South Parade Pier is in encouraging cycling, and how it would affect users if it was not there.

The survey should not take more than 10 minutes.  I would be grateful if you could pass it on to anyone else who might be interested.

Thanks, Roger Inkpen

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSesCOdeWo_W6hOrLzGKyKCG-fS_y-Z_gAX1Cp3IHfCnP5CTbA/viewform

Anyone up for a challenge?

Portsmouth Cycle Forum needs a chair. I’ve been proud to serve as the chair of Portsmouth Cycle Forum for the last three years but work and family commitments are making it impossible for me to continue.

The chair’s role is to lead our campaign and act as a focus for improving cycling in the city. It’s been an honour (and I don’t say that lightly) to serve as chair and it’s with enormous regret that I’m stepping down. I do, however, intend to continue to serve on the committee to support the new chair.

I announced my decision to step down as chair at our AGM and at our Open Meeting in April. Unfortunately a volunteer was not forthcoming to replace me so I agreed to continue for an interim period of three months whilst a new chair was sought. That three months has nearly passed and I fear, as I have less time to steer the campaign, that things are drifting and momentum is being lost.

I’m hoping that there is an enthusiastic volunteer out there, willing to come forward and lead the forum on the next step of its evolution. We’ve done some great work developing a transport plan for the city in A City to Share and that’s ready to be taken forward.

Portsmouth desperately needs a strong cycle forum to hold politicians and local authority officers to account. Portsmouth is a city made for cycling yet it’s one of the most dangerous places to cycle in the UK.

A strong cycle forum needs a strong leader. Could that be you?

All change at Kings Road roundabout?

As a response to meetings with the Portsmouth Cycle Forum and others traffic engineers have remodelled the Kings Road roundabout in Southsea. Unfortunately instead of being extensively changed to make it a safer roundabout for cyclists, pedestrians and motorists the roundabout has instead had minimal change at maximum cost.

Jon Spencer, Cycle Forum Chair, attended the meeting with Portsmouth City Council traffic officers. ‘I’m really disappointed with what has happened at Kings Road roundabout. In the meeting we talked about a complete overhaul of the roundabout including soft separators between the car and cycle lanes and making it the first Dutch style roundabout in the city. The layout now is hardly any different from what was there before and actually has some more dangerous features like the cycle lanes rejoining the main highway at right angles to the traffic.’

The Kings Road roundabout has one of the highest cycle accident rates in Portsmouth and this redesign will do little if anything to reduce that rate.

Portsmouth Cycle Forum is also pushing for a commitment from the council to be honoured that they are consulted on the future lay outs of other dangerous roundabouts in the city which are currently under review. This is as part of our campaign to halve cycle injury statistics by 2020

 

AGM 2016 Brainstorming exercise

After the formal business of our AGM we had a brainstorming exercise to get ideas on how Portsmouth City Council could implement the City to Share.  This covered the topics of Equality, Leisure, Planning, Safety and Transport.  Here are the scans of everyone’s ideas:

C2S Equality1 C2S Leisure1  C2S Leisure2 C2S Leisure3 C2S Planning1 C2S Planning2 C2S Safety1 C2S Safety2 C2S Safety3 C2S Transport2 C2S Transport1

2016 Annual General Meeting

On the 21 April we had our AGM.  These are the minutes:

  1. Welcome and introduction by the Chairman.

Jon Spencer welcomed everyone to the Annual General meeting.

  1. Minutes of Annual General Meeting of 20 March 2015: They were approved without dissent.
  2. Matters arising from last AGM: None.
  3. Chairman’s Report 2016:  Jon highlighted the highs and lows of the year and thanked those who had given their support, time and financial contribution. The full text is published here:

Chair Report 1516

5. Treasurer’s report and accounts:

Roger presented the detailed accounts of the Forum.  Thanks to the increase in annual subscriptions from £5 to £10 last year we are on a much sounder financial footing, although there was a fall in members from 66 to 60.  This is being addressed by regular reminders for those who need to renew.  The report can be found on the website. The meeting approved the report without dissent.

PCF Accounts report 15-16

6. Elections:

Jon has been Chair for 3 years and is finding the commitment too much to bear.  He stood down and asked if there were any nominations for a replacement.  None was forthcoming so Jon has agreed to stay as interim Chair for 3 months.  He urged members to think about candidates and we will need an EGM to elect a new Chair.  Jon also asked for nominations for vice-chair and secretary.  Jon also explained a little about the roles.  No nominations were forthcoming and so both will need to be chosen at the EGM.  Roger was only candidate for Treasurer and was willing to continue.  Other roles for committee members were explained.

Chairman: Jon Spencer will continue for 3 months as interim.  Replacement to be decided at EGM.

Vice-chairman: to be decided at EGM.

Secretary: to be decided at EGM.

Treasurer: Roger Inkpen was the only nomination. He was elected nem.com.

Notice: an EGM will need to be held by mid-July.          

7. Committee members: A communications officer is needed to co-ordinate posts for the website, Facebook, Twitter and chase stories for newsletters. Jon Riding agreed to take this role.  Roger will continue organising rides.  The following were sole nominations and were elected nem.com. en bloc:

Joe McGannan John Holland
Mike Dobson Phil Kirkham
Tom Hart Nicola Waight
Jon Riding Jacek Kopecky
Matthew Winnington Ian Saunders

8. Close: The Chair thanked all for attending.

The AGM closed at 7.45pm.  This was followed by an exercise to follow-up the City to Share cycle strategy.  Feedback from this will be uploaded to the website.

Election Meeting

Election time is nearing, with a councillor up for election in each of the 14 wards across the city on the 5th May. We’ve invited the representatives of each party to speak at our next meeting and we’ll be asking them to commit to halving the rate of cycling casualties on Portsmouth’s Roads by 2020. We’ll be inviting every candidate in the election to come along too and we’ll be writing to them individually to ask them for their support.

The main focus of the meeting will be to give you a chance to ask questions of our politicians about their plans and views on cycling.

The meeting will take place in Lecture Theatre 3, Richmond Building of the University of Portsmouth at 7pm on the 28th April.

Please let us know if you are planning on coming to this meeting by booking a place here. The meeting is free and open to all but it is REALLY helpful for us to know how many people are coming.

Click here to attend this meeting

April Meetings

We have not one but two important meetings coming up in April – our AGM and our Election Meeting.

Annual General Meeting

We will be holding our annual general meeting at 7pm on Thursday 21st April in the Community Room at the new Tesco Extra store on Fratton Way . The community room is to the right as you get to the upper level, behind the checkouts.

The AGM is open to paid up members only and is a chance for our members to elect a committee and have their say on how the cycle forum is run and how it focuses its campaigns. If you’d like to come alone but are not yet a member then you can join online now.

Please use this form to tell us you’d like to come to the AGM.

We’re really keen to get some new faces on to our committee – if you’d like to get involved or want to know more PLEASE get in touch.

The following committee posts will be up for election – you can put yourself forward for one of them either by letting us know in advance by email (you can reply to this one) or by coming along and volunteering on the night.

  • Chair – the chair provides leadership to ensure the committee functions effectively.
  • Vice Chair – the vice chair supports the chair, and is an ideal role for an aspiring chair!
  • Hon Secretary – the honorary secretary is responsible for the smooth running of the forum – making sure that meetings are planned and delivered effectively. This is not an admin job – it’s about making sure the forum’s operations keep running smoothly.
  • Treasurer – keeps us solvent.
  • Membership Secretary – recruiting and keeping track of members.
  • Communications Manager – managing our communications our members and supporters via email, web, social media and media.
  • Rides and Events Manager – manage our programme of rides and our attendance at events / fayre’s and so on.
  • Committee member (up to 6) – an ‘ordinary’ (although no-one’s ordinary) member of our committee, helping to decide how the forum runs and taking a share of the actions to deliver its business.

As well as the standard business of the AGM we discuss how the cycle forum is run and the focus of our campaigns. This is YOUR chance to have a say in how the forum is run.

Please use this form to tell us you’d like to come to the AGM.

Election Meeting

Election time is nearing, with a councillor up for election in each of the 14 wards across the city on the 5th May. We’ve invited the representatives of each party to speak at our next meeting and we’ll be asking them to commit to halving the rate of cycling casualties on Portsmouth’s Roads by 2020. We’ll be inviting every candidate in the election to come along too and we’ll be writing to them individually to ask them for their support.

The main focus of the meeting will be to give you a chance to ask questions of our politicians about their plans and views on cycling.

The meeting will take place in Lecture Theatre 3, Richmond Building of the University of Portsmouth at 7pm on the 28th April.

Please let us know if you are planning on coming to this meeting by booking a place here. The meeting is free and open to all but it is REALLY helpful for us to know how many people are coming.

Click here to attend this meeting

A bad day for cycling at the T&T committee

Today two of our committee members – Joe McGannan and Jon Spencer – attended the Portsmouth City Council Traffic & Transportation Decision meeting at the Guildhall. Joe was to make a deputation against proposals to narrow the pavements in North End to squeeze in more parking. I was to make a deputation to keep two way cycling in Portchester and Wymering roads in North End. The latter decision was made in accordance with our wishes but the former raised serious concerns.

The meeting was chaired by Cllr Linda Symes, deputising for Cllr Ken Ellcome.

North End Parking

Cllr Symes approved the plans to narrow the pavements in North End to create more on street parking. This was despite three deputations objecting to the parking proposals made by members of the public. This was despite objections were raised by a bus company and the Cycle Forum. This was despite the fact that nobody felt it worth coming to the meeting to support the proposals.

Sustainable transport used to be a thing in North End, back when there were sustainable businesses

Sustainable transport used to be a thing in North End, back when there were sustainable businesses

London Road is the most dangerous road in Portsmouth for cyclists. We know that outside of a few London boroughs Portsmouth is the most dangerous city in the country for cyclists. That makes London Road amongst the most dangerous roads for cyclists in the entire country.

Our view is that introducing more parking can only make things more dangerous for cyclists and pedestrians. More cars reversing. More cars pulling out. More doors opening in the path of cyclists. Worse sight lines. Less space. Since 2005 there has been one fatality, six serious injuries and over 40 slight injuries in road traffic incidents on the 200 metre stretch between Chichester Road and Laburnum Grove alone (source: crashmap.co.uk).

We would argue that any scheme that might make this dire situation worse should be subject to the sternest scrutiny. That has not been the case here. We’d like councillors to commit to halving the rate of cycling casualties in Portsmouth by 2020. This decision will not help with that goal; in fact it will quite conceivably make things worse.

This bad decision has been worsened by the complete lack of transparency in the decision making. When summing up the evidence prior to announcing her decision Cllr Symes stated that the council had figures showing the benefit to business and that this outweighed any safety concern. After the meeting I asked Cllr Symes for these figures and it transpired that there were no figures. She was, however, confident that the benefits were ‘massive’. It appears that the public meeting was misled into thinking there were figures backing the decision when there were not.

A subsequent discussion with the senior officer in charge of Traffic and Transportation revealed that the sole basis for the decision was a discussion with a self-selecting group of traders. Despite the fact that the substance of all the objecting views is a matter of public record in the meeting reports pack the record of that discussion with traders will never be published and subject to public scrutiny. This is neither transparent nor equitable.

In February 2015 the Portsmouth City Council Economic Development, Culture & Leisure Scrutiny Panel released a report entitled “Revitalising Local High Streets And Secondary Shopping Areas In The City“. This report was based on extensive evidence gathering from traders and community stakeholders and was put together by a team of councillors from all parties. Today’s decision ignored that work altogether.

It seems that this decision to introduce parking has been made on a hunch. No assessment of the impact on an already serious safety problem. No quantifiable assessment of the potential economic benefit. No equality impact assessment.

A bad day for cycling. A bad day for democratic accountability too.

Open Meeting Report

Lecture Theatre 2, Richmond Building, University of Portsmouth, 7pm Thursday 11th February.

Marcus Jones: TRL Trials of innovative cycling improvements

Transport for London commissioned the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL)  to undertake a range of off-street trials of innovative cycling improvements.

Marcus Jones, from TRL gave a comprehensive presentation of these trials which included detailed research into the reactions of the 6000 volunteer participants to the various road layouts trialled, including different styles of roundabouts and cyclist/traffic separation technologies. Based on analysis of the trials, decisions will be made as to whether or not they can be introduced on-street, subject to Department for Transport approval.

Further information here.

Nicola Waight: Vision Zero

Relating to TRL’s research, above, Nicola Waight presented a short video on Vision Zero: a multi-national road traffic safety project that aims to achieve a highway system with no fatalities or serious injuries in road traffic.

Vision Zero started in Sweden and was approved by their parliament in October 1997. It has since been adopted by cities worldwide. Its key idea is that transport systems traditionally place responsibility for safety on road users. The Vision Zero Initiative puts this responsibility on system design.

There followed a discussion about the applicability of this approach to Portsmouth with its country-leading cyclist casualty rate. Following the lead from Portsmouth South’s MP, Flick Drummond, Ken Ellcome, Portsmouth Councillor with responsibility for Transport, endorsed PCF’s City to Share target of reducing Portsmouth’s 2014 cyclist casualty rate by half, by 2020. Councillor Ellcome mentioned the cycle path to be introduced on the north side of Goldsmiths Avenue as an example of the Council’s commitment to improve the safety of cyclists in the city.

Bernie Topham, COO, University of Portsmouth

Bernie presented on the University’s ambition to promote more sustainable travel options for the c.22,000 staff and students of the University. One aspect seen as an enabler for greater use of cycles was the provision of on-street parking in residential areas of the city, particularly around Albert Rd where there is a high density of student housing.

Download Slides – February Meeting

Stretch Yourself with the Cathedral Challenge

Portsmouth CTC are organising a series of week-end rides for people new to group riding or who haven’t cycled for a while. They start after Easter with short ‘get to know you’ rides that include a free bike check and progress through longer distances, tackling a series of challenges along the way:

  • Bronze: Havant to Portsmouth cathedral and back
  • Silver: Chichester cathedral and back via the South Downs National Park
  • Gold: Winchester cathedral and back

All rides are led by CTC-accredited ride leaders and supported by experienced riders. They start from The Spring Centre in Havant or Bidbury Park in Bedhampton.

The Cathedral Challenge page provides more information including some inspirational stories from some of our members who have achieved far more on a bike than they thought possible.

There’s no need for sponsorship, and there’s no fee to join any of the rides. The only cost is one-year’s subscription to CTC if people join more than three rides.

The event is inspired by Bristol CTC’s very successful ‘Get Gorge-ous’ rides.

Open Meeting: Modern Cycle Infrastructure At Last?

Anyone who’s travelled in Europe will have come across a whole variety of features on the road designed to help cyclists, things that are alien to us here in Britain. Segregation at junctions, protected lanes on roundabouts, low level traffic lights, bus stop bypasses to name  a few. Maybe you’ve seen them and wondered why they are not in common use here too.

The good news is that all of these things have been on trial at the Transport Research Lab in Berkshire and as a result may be coming to the UK at last.

At our next public meeting we’ll be hearing from Marcus Jones from the Transport Research Lab about the outcome of those trials and what’s being done to follow them up.

Anyone who’s been to one of our meetings before will know that we’re very concerned about safety on our roads. Portsmouth’s record for cycle safety is fairly dismal and we’re pushing the council to commit to tackling it. At the meeting we’ll be finding out the Vision Zero initiative. It can be summarised in one sentence: No loss of life is acceptable. The Swedish Government and some major US cities have signed up for Vision Zero – could Portsmouth do the same?

We’ll also be hearing from the Chief Operating Officer of the University of Portsmouth about how the 22,000 or so staff and students of the University get around and what is being done to help them get onto their bikes.

The meeting will be in Lecture Theatre 2, Richmond Building, University of Portsmouth at 7pm on Thursday 11th February. We really hope to see you there.

Add the meeting to your calendar

Find the meeting on facebook

Happy Christmas

On behalf of Portsmouth Cycle Forum I’d like to wish all our members and supporters a very happy christmas and may 2016 bring health and happiness to you all.

I’d like to thank you all for your support in 2015 and hope you will continue to support us in 2016. As you know Portsmouth Cycle Forum depends on its members to keep campaigning and we are extremely grateful to all who have joined this year. If you’d like to join then you can do so here on our website.

Our first open meeting of 2016 will be on Thursday 11th February at 7pm so keep the date free. Full details of the meeting will come out in the new year but we are working on a great line up of speakers to follow up the last meeting – our most successful ever.